Oliver SchneiderHandMark MenusDeveloping a triangulation system for digital game events, observational video, and psychophysiological data to study emotional responses to a virtual characterStephen DammPersonalized Simulations of Colour Vision DeficiencyDirections in Physiological Game Evaluation and InteractionEvaluating Groupware UsabilityBenjamin Buttlar3D Attentional Maps - Aggregated Gaze Visualizations in Three-Dimensional Virtual EnvironmentsNajeeb KhanScott DavisGaurav AroraSaul GreenbergGamification: Using Game Design Elements in Non-Gaming ContextsPlayer-game Interaction Through Affective SoundSingle-Handed HandMark Menus: Rapid Command Selection on TabletsWeston CarlsonColby JohansonKathrin GerlingWiimote vs. Controller: Electroencephalographic Measurement of Affective Gameplay InteractionGamification: Toward a DefinitionGranular SynthesisCreating and Interpreting Abstract Visualizations of EmotionMd. Sami UddinDisconnection Handling in Real-time GroupwareAaron GenestBrain and Body Interfaces: Designing for Meaningful InteractionInteraction Techniques for Digital TablesSocial Navigation for Loosely-Coupled Information Seeking in Tightly-Knit Groups using WebWearMike SheininRobert KapiszkaHow Mobile is Mobile Gaming? Contextual Influences on Mobile Player Experience - A Model PropositionMiguel NacentaEmotional response and visual attention to non-photorealistic imagesSILVERVIZ: Extending SILVER for coordination in distributed collaborative modelingScott OlsonGregor McEwanThe Search Dashboard:  How Reflection and Comparison Impact Search BehaviorKatherine SchrammRita OrjiHandMark Menus: Rapid Command Selection and Large  Command Sets on Multi-Touch DisplaysScott BatemanFran├žois Roewer-DespresRich User Embodiment in GroupwareSteve SutcliffeTarget Assistance for Subtly Balancing Competitive PlayCarrie GatesNickolas Gough

The Human-Computer Interaction Lab is a research facility in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Saskatchewan. We carry out research in computer-supported cooperation, next-generation interfaces, computer games, affective computing, surface computing, and information visualization.

Faculty

Regan Mandryk
University of Saskatchewan
Carl Gutwin
University of Saskatchewan
Ian Stavness
University of Saskatchewan

Current Research

HandMark Menus
HandMark Menus are rapid access techniques specially designed for large multi-touch surfaces. There are two versions of HandMark Menus, and both place commands in spatially stable spaces around and between the fingers of both hands, so with practice, users can learn locations of commands by taking advantage of the proprioceptive knowledge of their own hands and fingers.
Jelly Polo: a sports game using small-scale exertion
Sports video games should be inherently competitive, but they fall short in providing true competition for the players.
SWaGUR: Saskatchewan-Waterloo Games User Research
The Canadian computer game industry is the third largest in the world, behind the USA and Japan. The sector contributes $2.3 billion annually to Canada's GDP, it employs 16,500 people, and the demand for skilled talent in creative and technical roles is increasing: 40% of Canadian game companies expect over 25% growth in the next 2 years.
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Recent Publications

Habits and preferences of players as a context for the design of game-based digital mental health interventions
Mandryk, R., Birk, M. (2017), Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. forthcoming, <doi:10.2196/jmir.6906>
The Effects of Artificial Landmarks on Learning and Performance in Spatial-Memory Interfaces
Uddin, M., Gutwin, C., Cockburn, A. (2017), CHI '17: Proceedings of the 2017 SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, CO, USA. <doi:10.1145/3025453.3025497>
Through the Looking Glass: Effects of Feedback on Self-Awareness and Conversation during Video Chat
Miller, M., Mandryk, R., Birk, M., Depping, A., Patel, T. (2017), Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, CO, USA. Honourable Mention Award (top 5%). <doi:10.1145/3025453.3025548>
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